The role of protest in feminism

Women from different generations compare the feminist movements and the role protest has played

By Rebekah Alvey, F/G Scholar

Throughout the history of women’s movements, marches have played a significant role in showing civil disobedience and dissent. The marches demonstrate unity and passion for the cause while also highlighting the changes in the movement and the flaws. Continue reading The role of protest in feminism

History of protest music in the United States

By Hannah Shaffer, F/G Scholar

Protest music has been around in the United States ever since the United States became a country. Songs like “Free America” by Joseph Warren were used as a call to action for colonists to act in the Revolutionary War. Continue reading History of protest music in the United States

The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Throughout American history, clothing has been an underrated tool utilized in social and political protest movements, and its use became most prevalent in the twentieth century with each decade using clothing and accessories to protest society in unique ways. Continue reading The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

Cultural ‘Safe Spaces’ and their influence on protest

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

The term ‘safe space’ became widely known and debated after the 2016 presidential election when many said that they required such a space because they felt targeted in the political climate. Others feel that safe spaces act as a shield that protects people from any ideas that conflict with their own and overly-sensitizes society. Continue reading Cultural ‘Safe Spaces’ and their influence on protest

Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

May 4, 1960 will forever represent a turning point in anti-Vietnam rhetoric. Just days after President Richard Nixon had declared a United States invasion of Cambodia – a nation which had not been present in the Vietnam War until this point – protests popped up across the country. Protesters advocated against the war, against the invasion of Cambodia, and often against further use of violence. In response, students affiliated with anti-war efforts at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio began a series of demonstrations. Continue reading Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

The art of speech

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

From a shout or cry in a crowd to the lyrics in a song, every citizen in the United States has the right to free speech, a freedom granted by the First Amendment. In theory, the freedom is to allow for a free trade of ideas between individuals and to encourage diverse perspectives. However, this freedom is oftentimes not spoken at all. Continue reading The art of speech

Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Mary Beth Tinker visits WKU

Des Moines, Iowa, native Mary Beth Tinker, then 13 years old, had just started the eighth grade when the United States officially entered the Vietnam War in 1965. Tinker grew up in a Methodist Christian family with parents who became involved in social issues, like the Civil Rights movement. Continue reading Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights