The right to vote for some, not all: An analysis of racism in the women’s suffrage movement

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

 

 

The debate about the legacy of the suffrage movement has been in the news cycle lately with the coverage about voters in this past election going from the polls to Susan B. Anthony’s grave to place their “I voted” stickers on her tombstone as a tribute for her work. News coverage pointed out that this tribute was particularly fitting because a record number of women were elected as governors and to Congress during this election cycle. Continue reading The right to vote for some, not all: An analysis of racism in the women’s suffrage movement

Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

The 1920s are closely regarded as a time of both social strife and social reform, specifically for women, because of women. In 1919, women’s temperance movements across the nation were largely successful in passing the Prohibition Act – banning the sale of alcohol, as well as its manufacturing and transportation. In 1920, the Women’s Suffrage movement happily saw passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave white women the right to vote.

As the centennials of each political milestone are nearing, it is immensely important to reevaluate how we should celebrate and talk about them. Continue reading Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage