The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Throughout American history, clothing has been an underrated tool utilized in social and political protest movements, and its use became most prevalent in the twentieth century with each decade using clothing and accessories to protest society in unique ways. Continue reading The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

May 4, 1960 will forever represent a turning point in anti-Vietnam rhetoric. Just days after President Richard Nixon had declared a United States invasion of Cambodia – a nation which had not been present in the Vietnam War until this point – protests popped up across the country. Protesters advocated against the war, against the invasion of Cambodia, and often against further use of violence. In response, students affiliated with anti-war efforts at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio began a series of demonstrations. Continue reading Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

Alan Canfora: Kent State survivor’s story

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

As a 21-year-old growing up in Barberton, Ohio, in 1970, Alan Canfora never planned on joining the anti-Vietnam War movement. Like many in his generation, Canfora had been raised to support the military because his parents served in World War II, his mother as an Army nurse and his father in the Army. Continue reading Alan Canfora: Kent State survivor’s story

Tinker vs. DesMoines: Protest inside the schoolhouse door

By Lane Hendrick and Hannah Shaffer, F/G Scholars

Mary Beth Tinker and her mother at a Des Moines school board meeting, 1965 (Courtesy Mary Beth Tinker)

In December of 1965 a group comprised of both adults and students held a meeting and decided to share publicly their objections to the war in Vietnam and to show support for a Christmas Truce, they decided to wear black armbands in protest of such hostilities and to fast on Dec. 16 and on New Year’s Eve.

School principals in Des Moines were aware that people planned to protest the war in such a way and on Dec. 14, 1965 they created and adopted a policy saying that any student seen wearing an armband would be asked to take it off and if they refused they would be suspended until they returned to school without the armband. Continue reading Tinker vs. DesMoines: Protest inside the schoolhouse door