Protests and social media: How dissent and technology intersect to empower

By Evan Heichelbech, F/G Scholar

Mary Beth Tinker is nearly five decades removed from the landmark Supreme Court ruling which told her she didn’t have to shed her constitutional rights at the schoolhouse gate, but she credits more than just the Supreme Court justices for her 13-year-old self’s victory in the case. Continue reading Protests and social media: How dissent and technology intersect to empower

Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

May 4, 1960 will forever represent a turning point in anti-Vietnam rhetoric. Just days after President Richard Nixon had declared a United States invasion of Cambodia – a nation which had not been present in the Vietnam War until this point – protests popped up across the country. Protesters advocated against the war, against the invasion of Cambodia, and often against further use of violence. In response, students affiliated with anti-war efforts at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio began a series of demonstrations. Continue reading Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

“Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

The movie “Fire in the Heartland” begins with different shots of Kent State’s modern campus until a foggy substance begins to fill the screen, slowly revealing itself to be the tear gas thrown by the National Guard at hundreds of college students protesting the Vietnam War on May 4, 1970. The audience is transported back to that fateful day as the narrator begins to speak about the 67 total bullets fired over the course of 13 seconds which killed four students, two of which weren’t even protesting. Continue reading “Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

Black United Students: Laying the groundwork for student activism at Kent State

By Lane Hedrick and Evan Heichelbech, F/G Scholars

The story of the events that took place at Kent State University in May of 1970 cannot be told without mention of a particular group of students who helped spark the flame of activism on campus long before four students were killed in an anti-war protest. The Black United Students, better known as BUS, became the critical link between black and white activism at Kent State. Without BUS, Kent State’s role in American history may have looked totally different. Continue reading Black United Students: Laying the groundwork for student activism at Kent State

History of dissent at Kent State, before and after May 4, 1970

By Evan Heichelbech and Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholars

Sixty-seven rounds in 13 seconds. Four dead and nine wounded. These are the numbers that would consume the public’s attention in the days following the May 4, 1970 shootings at Kent State University. But those four numbers do not tell the whole story of Kent State’s legacy. In fact, those statistics came from just one day of Kent State’s rich history of protest, a day that was preceded by years of powerful and memorable scenes of American dissent in action. Continue reading History of dissent at Kent State, before and after May 4, 1970