The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Throughout American history, clothing has been an underrated tool utilized in social and political protest movements, and its use became most prevalent in the twentieth century with each decade using clothing and accessories to protest society in unique ways. Continue reading The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Mary Beth Tinker visits WKU

Des Moines, Iowa, native Mary Beth Tinker, then 13 years old, had just started the eighth grade when the United States officially entered the Vietnam War in 1965. Tinker grew up in a Methodist Christian family with parents who became involved in social issues, like the Civil Rights movement. Continue reading Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights

Reflection: The Safety-Valve Justification in the digital age

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

The Safety-Valve Justification theory is unique among First Amendment theories because it is purely pragmatic (Gey, 2008) . It does not subscribe to the same idealism as other theories that claim that freedom of speech eventually leads to the truth and an overall stronger and more educated public. Instead, it argues that freedom of speech acts as a literal safety valve, so that people who feel alienated from larger society are able to air their frustrations without becoming violent or revolutionary. In this way, freedom of speech is used to protect the general public from those on the fringe of society.

This theory remains relevant in the digital age as citizens try to navigate a world in which all opinions can be dispersed to millions with the push of a button. In fact, a new kind of ‘safety valve’ has developed that helps people to evade injustices that they feel the government has brought upon them. Continue reading Reflection: The Safety-Valve Justification in the digital age