Reflection: The harsh legacy of speaking out in sports

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

At Muhammad Ali’s funeral in 2016, both former President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama spoke fondly of the sports star and activist. In a letter read at the ceremony, President Obama said, “Muhammad Ali was America. Muhammad Ali will always be America. What a man.” (BBC 2016) However, when Ali was building the very legacy that many praises him for today, it is extremely unlikely that President Lyndon Johnson would have shared the warm sentiments of President Obama. Continue reading Reflection: The harsh legacy of speaking out in sports

Reflection: The power of protest by design

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

The second half of the 20th century marked a change in the expression of the United States people. The art began to mimic the attitudes of the 1960s and 70s, and differed from the bright colored war propaganda of WWII, said Brian Resnick in his article, “Protest Posters From the Vietnam Era.” Art began to challenge the U.S. government and question the intentions of the war. College campuses, in particular, exploded with dissent and activism–one being Kent State University (Hensley and Lewis, 2010). Continue reading Reflection: The power of protest by design

Reflection: The other face of Vietnam, protests supporting the war

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

The era of the Vietnam War is well known for the anti-war protests, particularly during 1968. They were covered heavily by the media, and now some of the most poignant pictures of the war are of demonstrators marching or protestors burning draft cards. A lesser-known area of the Vietnam War protests were the marches and rallies held in support of the war. Continue reading Reflection: The other face of Vietnam, protests supporting the war