What we learned and why we went to Kent State and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

By Evan Heichelbech, F/G Scholar

It’s impossible to adequately study protest in the United States without discussing the Vietnam War era of dissent. The late 1960’s through the early 1970’s was a formative time for Americans when it came to exercising their First Amendment rights, and the height of the tension came on May 4, 1970 at Kent State University. Continue reading What we learned and why we went to Kent State and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

May 4, 1960 will forever represent a turning point in anti-Vietnam rhetoric. Just days after President Richard Nixon had declared a United States invasion of Cambodia – a nation which had not been present in the Vietnam War until this point – protests popped up across the country. Protesters advocated against the war, against the invasion of Cambodia, and often against further use of violence. In response, students affiliated with anti-war efforts at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio began a series of demonstrations. Continue reading Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

WKU alumna Mindy Farmer leads effort to remember Kent State victims

By Emma Austin, F/G Scholar

When she gives tours of the site where four students of Kent State University were murdered by Ohio National Guardsmen in 1970, Mindy Farmer, director of the May 4 Visitors Center, stops at each memorial marking the exact location each of the four students was shot.

“I want people to know something about them, who they were,” Farmer said. “That’s something we’ve only just started to learn as we’ve researched them.” Continue reading WKU alumna Mindy Farmer leads effort to remember Kent State victims

Kent State: A tour of the May 4 site

By Nicole Ziege (Video) and Emma Collins (Article), F/G Scholars

The site of the Kent State shooting still somewhat resembles the spot where four students were killed and nine injured nearly 50 years ago on May 4, 1970.

Since then, buildings have sprung up nearby, a gym has been built on part of the site and trees have been cut down. But the spots where four students — Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder — were shot are stilled marked on the parking lot where they died, and visitors can walk the same path that the students and national guardsmen walked long ago on a day that would mark a turning point in the public’s opinion of the Vietnam War. Continue reading Kent State: A tour of the May 4 site

Protest songs continue to spark controversy

By Emma Collins and Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholars

Helen Reardon grew up during the height of rock ‘n roll, a “lad[y] of the ‘60s,” as she described herself. She came of age when rock music challenged the status quo angering the older, more conservative generation with its sexual innuendos and political undertones. Continue reading Protest songs continue to spark controversy

“Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

The movie “Fire in the Heartland” begins with different shots of Kent State’s modern campus until a foggy substance begins to fill the screen, slowly revealing itself to be the tear gas thrown by the National Guard at hundreds of college students protesting the Vietnam War on May 4, 1970. The audience is transported back to that fateful day as the narrator begins to speak about the 67 total bullets fired over the course of 13 seconds which killed four students, two of which weren’t even protesting. Continue reading “Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

Black United Students: Laying the groundwork for student activism at Kent State

By Lane Hedrick and Evan Heichelbech, F/G Scholars

The story of the events that took place at Kent State University in May of 1970 cannot be told without mention of a particular group of students who helped spark the flame of activism on campus long before four students were killed in an anti-war protest. The Black United Students, better known as BUS, became the critical link between black and white activism at Kent State. Without BUS, Kent State’s role in American history may have looked totally different. Continue reading Black United Students: Laying the groundwork for student activism at Kent State