Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

The 1920s are closely regarded as a time of both social strife and social reform, specifically for women, because of women. In 1919, women’s temperance movements across the nation were largely successful in passing the Prohibition Act – banning the sale of alcohol, as well as its manufacturing and transportation. In 1920, the Women’s Suffrage movement happily saw passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave white women the right to vote.

As the centennials of each political milestone are nearing, it is immensely important to reevaluate how we should celebrate and talk about them. Continue reading Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage

Reflection: Journalists or activists?

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

During last week’s class, we discussed journalists like Elijah Lovejoy and Ida B. Wells. Dr. Lee asked us if we would categorize journalists like Lovejoy as journalists or as activists. I said that we should still label them as journalists because journalists and activists walked a fine line in the 1800s, as they still do today. The work of journalists is to tell stories and bring awareness to certain topics and stories on a national and global scale. One could argue that the goal of activists is very similar in that they also want to bring awareness to certain topics and issues happening on a national and global scale. Continue reading Reflection: Journalists or activists?

Reflection: The legacy of Prohibition

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

Prohibition was one of a number of political movements that arose during the 1800s. Its proponents included people who were active in the women’s suffrage and the anti-slavery movements, and like those two movements, the movement to outlaw alcohol was ultimately successful with the passage of the 18th Amendment, which took effect January 1920 (Sanneh).

Prohibition’s legacy is mixed. In many schools, students are taught that the movement failed and lead primarily to the black market, bootlegging and an increase in organized crime (Moore). In reality, however, Prohibition did lead to some success Continue reading Reflection: The legacy of Prohibition

Reflection: William Lloyd Garrison and the practice of journalism

By Evan Heichelbech, F/G Scholar

Today, there is more education and information about journalism and what it’s supposed to be than there ever has been. Oddly enough, journalism is arguably under more attack today than it ever has been. Time has allowed for more education, more information and more good examples of what journalism is supposed to be. But it has also allowed for more opportunities for lines to be blurred, imitations to be made and presidents to mock the principles of the profession. Continue reading Reflection: William Lloyd Garrison and the practice of journalism

Reflection: Which side was Elizabeth Cady Stanton on?

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

How can a woman who attends London’s World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840 also be considered a white supremacist amidst all her efforts? Despite the world knowing her as the woman who led the suffrage movement and helping grant future women the same rights as their male counterparts, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is described as both. Continue reading Reflection: Which side was Elizabeth Cady Stanton on?

Reflection: Elijah Lovejoy and hiding bias

By Cameron Coyle/F-G Scholar

The majority of journalism students in America are taught to keep their political beliefs to themselves, but this seems to contrast the fundamental beliefs of Elijah Lovejoy, the man John Quincy Adams called “the first American martyr to the freedom of the press and the freedom of the slave” after his murder in 1837 (“The Story of Elijah Parish Lovejoy”). Continue reading Reflection: Elijah Lovejoy and hiding bias