The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Throughout American history, clothing has been an underrated tool utilized in social and political protest movements, and its use became most prevalent in the twentieth century with each decade using clothing and accessories to protest society in unique ways. Continue reading The importance of clothing in 1960s protest movements

Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

Mary Beth Tinker visits WKU

Des Moines, Iowa, native Mary Beth Tinker, then 13 years old, had just started the eighth grade when the United States officially entered the Vietnam War in 1965. Tinker grew up in a Methodist Christian family with parents who became involved in social issues, like the Civil Rights movement. Continue reading Mary Beth Tinker discusses her journey with students’ rights

Reflection: Legacy of American labor song poems

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

American history has been filled with interesting forms of protests, and one of the more underrated forms includes the protest songs that are discussed in “Jesus was a Carpenter,” written by Clark Halker. According to the article, from 1865-1895, there were thousands of labor song poems that appeared in labor papers, union journals, broadsides, songsters and chapbooks. Continue reading Reflection: Legacy of American labor song poems

Reflection: Journalists or activists?

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

During last week’s class, we discussed journalists like Elijah Lovejoy and Ida B. Wells. Dr. Lee asked us if we would categorize journalists like Lovejoy as journalists or as activists. I said that we should still label them as journalists because journalists and activists walked a fine line in the 1800s, as they still do today. The work of journalists is to tell stories and bring awareness to certain topics and stories on a national and global scale. One could argue that the goal of activists is very similar in that they also want to bring awareness to certain topics and issues happening on a national and global scale. Continue reading Reflection: Journalists or activists?

Alan Canfora: Kent State survivor’s story

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

As a 21-year-old growing up in Barberton, Ohio, in 1970, Alan Canfora never planned on joining the anti-Vietnam War movement. Like many in his generation, Canfora had been raised to support the military because his parents served in World War II, his mother as an Army nurse and his father in the Army. Continue reading Alan Canfora: Kent State survivor’s story

Reflection: Freedom vs. security and the First Amendment

By Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholar

When a country like the United States declares war, balancing freedom and security is one of its greatest challenges because while the government needs to maintain the freedoms of its people, it also wants to ensure national security. In my opinion, there are two types of national security: national security in terms of securing victory during the war with enough supplies and man power, and national security in terms of preventing foreign threats against potential foreign threats. Continue reading Reflection: Freedom vs. security and the First Amendment

Edwards vs. South Carolina: Protecting the right to march

By Emma Collins and Nicole Ziege, F/G Scholars

Students march outside South Carolina State House in 1961 (Photo http://www. sanantoniopeace.center/february-25-in-peace-justice-history-3/)

On March 2, 1961, nearly 200 African American high school and college students gathered at the Zion Baptist Church in Columbia, South Carolina. Together, they marched six blocks down to the state capitol building to protest racial inequality and segregation. When they arrived, they proceeded to walk around the state house for 45 minutes while a crowd of nearly 350 onlookers gathered. The city manager began to worry that the situation would become dangerous and that traffic would further be disruptive, so he asked the police officers to tell the crowd of protestors to disperse. The police complied and told the protestors they had 15 minutes to disperse or they would be arrested for disorderly conduct and breach of the peace. Continue reading Edwards vs. South Carolina: Protecting the right to march