Cultural ‘Safe Spaces’ and their influence on protest

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

The term ‘safe space’ became widely known and debated after the 2016 presidential election when many said that they required such a space because they felt targeted in the political climate. Others feel that safe spaces act as a shield that protects people from any ideas that conflict with their own and overly-sensitizes society. Continue reading Cultural ‘Safe Spaces’ and their influence on protest

Reflection: The harsh legacy of speaking out in sports

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

At Muhammad Ali’s funeral in 2016, both former President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama spoke fondly of the sports star and activist. In a letter read at the ceremony, President Obama said, “Muhammad Ali was America. Muhammad Ali will always be America. What a man.” (BBC 2016) However, when Ali was building the very legacy that many praises him for today, it is extremely unlikely that President Lyndon Johnson would have shared the warm sentiments of President Obama. Continue reading Reflection: The harsh legacy of speaking out in sports

Reflection: The impact of Me Too

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

In the wake of the Brent Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, it’s time to take a look at how much of an impact the Me Too movement has actually had.

The Me Too movement has largely been regarded as a success. It has undoubtedly changed public perceptions about how many women are sexually harassed and how that harassment should be dealt with. However, how many of those that have been accused have faced actual repercussions and is the movement beneficial for those whose harassers are not high-profile men? Continue reading Reflection: The impact of Me Too

The May 4 Visitor Center at Kent State University

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

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The May 4 Visitor Center at Kent State serves as both a memorial to those that died on May 4th and a museum about the United State’s political climate at the start of the 1970’s. Continue reading The May 4 Visitor Center at Kent State University

Reflection: Is it OK to punch a Nazi?

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

Fleischaker Greene Logo“Is it okay to punch a Nazi?” is a question that would seemingly be simple to answer. In the past, Nazis have only been thought of as the obviously evil masterminds behind the genocide of millions of people. However, what if the ‘Nazi’ in question, is a well-dressed man who calls himself a member of the ‘Alt-Right’ and is exercising his right to speech? Is he still easily punchable? Continue reading Reflection: Is it OK to punch a Nazi?

Reflection: The Safety-Valve Justification in the digital age

By Lillie Eastham, F/G Scholar

The Safety-Valve Justification theory is unique among First Amendment theories because it is purely pragmatic (Gey, 2008) . It does not subscribe to the same idealism as other theories that claim that freedom of speech eventually leads to the truth and an overall stronger and more educated public. Instead, it argues that freedom of speech acts as a literal safety valve, so that people who feel alienated from larger society are able to air their frustrations without becoming violent or revolutionary. In this way, freedom of speech is used to protect the general public from those on the fringe of society.

This theory remains relevant in the digital age as citizens try to navigate a world in which all opinions can be dispersed to millions with the push of a button. In fact, a new kind of ‘safety valve’ has developed that helps people to evade injustices that they feel the government has brought upon them. Continue reading Reflection: The Safety-Valve Justification in the digital age