Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

May 4, 1960 will forever represent a turning point in anti-Vietnam rhetoric. Just days after President Richard Nixon had declared a United States invasion of Cambodia – a nation which had not been present in the Vietnam War until this point – protests popped up across the country. Protesters advocated against the war, against the invasion of Cambodia, and often against further use of violence. In response, students affiliated with anti-war efforts at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio began a series of demonstrations. Continue reading Student activism in tumultuous times: Responses to the Kent State shootings and invasion of Cambodia

Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

The 1920s are closely regarded as a time of both social strife and social reform, specifically for women, because of women. In 1919, women’s temperance movements across the nation were largely successful in passing the Prohibition Act – banning the sale of alcohol, as well as its manufacturing and transportation. In 1920, the Women’s Suffrage movement happily saw passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave white women the right to vote.

As the centennials of each political milestone are nearing, it is immensely important to reevaluate how we should celebrate and talk about them. Continue reading Reflection: Retrospective on Prohibition and women’s suffrage

Reflection: Mobilizing against muzzling, 1798 and 2018

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

Fewer than 10 years after the signing of the Bill of Rights, which included the First Amendment and freedom of speech, President John Adams pushed forward the Alien and Sedition Acts. The Acts limited the ability to protest the government, refused passage into America if one was an immigrant and essentially eliminated freedom of the press. Each action included within the Acts highlighted a fear held by President Adams: criticism. While much could be said about how the acts were passed and how they came to be written, perhaps the most intriguing aspect is how protests and mobilization efforts against the acts came to fruition. Continue reading Reflection: Mobilizing against muzzling, 1798 and 2018

Reflection: Not your Founding Fathers’ protests

By Lane Hedrick, F/G Scholar

While America has roots in protest, the Founding Fathers could not have fathomed the way modern protests could mobilize, spread, and find success. The year of 2018 has not been immune to heartache and damage, but it has found a series of small lights in the darkness: protests. Between Black Lives Matter, #MarchForOurLives and more, the American public will no longer stand idly by as people die. Continue reading Reflection: Not your Founding Fathers’ protests