The art of speech

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

From a shout or cry in a crowd to the lyrics in a song, every citizen in the United States has the right to free speech, a freedom granted by the First Amendment. In theory, the freedom is to allow for a free trade of ideas between individuals and to encourage diverse perspectives. However, this freedom is oftentimes not spoken at all. Continue reading The art of speech

Reflection: The power of protest by design

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

The second half of the 20th century marked a change in the expression of the United States people. The art began to mimic the attitudes of the 1960s and 70s, and differed from the bright colored war propaganda of WWII, said Brian Resnick in his article, “Protest Posters From the Vietnam Era.” Art began to challenge the U.S. government and question the intentions of the war. College campuses, in particular, exploded with dissent and activism–one being Kent State University (Hensley and Lewis, 2010). Continue reading Reflection: The power of protest by design

Reflection: Which side was Elizabeth Cady Stanton on?

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

How can a woman who attends London’s World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840 also be considered a white supremacist amidst all her efforts? Despite the world knowing her as the woman who led the suffrage movement and helping grant future women the same rights as their male counterparts, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is described as both. Continue reading Reflection: Which side was Elizabeth Cady Stanton on?

Reflection: Why Donald Trump should hate Henry Clay

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

Fleischaker Greene LogoThe Alien and Sedition Acts were passed prohibiting the writing, printing, uttering or publishing of “any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings’” against the president and other executive branch officials, according to Ronald G. Shafer in his article, “The thin-skinned president who made it illegal to criticize his office.” The president who passed this law was John Adams, a commander-in-chief, oftentimes compared to today’s president of the United States, Donald Trump. However, the comparison I would like to make is between President Trump and Kentucky statesman, Henry Clay, also known as “the Great Compromiser.” Continue reading Reflection: Why Donald Trump should hate Henry Clay

Abrams vs. United States: Limits to dissent in a time of war

By Lillie Eastham and Hayley Robb, F/G Scholars

Socialists arrested for distributing anti-war pamphlets (Photo Courtesy UMKC Law School)

Abrams v. United States (1919) stems from a time when war was raging with Germany on Russian soil after revolutionists had overtaken the tsarists (Oyez, 2018). In an act of protest against the war, six Russian immigrants were involved in releasing thousands of pamphlets encouraging the general strike of producing munition necessary for the war efforts (Oyez, 2018). The pamphlets were dropped from a building window in New York City – one was written in English while the other was in Yiddish (Oyez, 2018). Continue reading Abrams vs. United States: Limits to dissent in a time of war

Reflection: Art and freedom of speech

By Hayley Robb, F/G Scholar

In a profession committed to accuracy, brevity and objectivity, the foundations of the First Amendment theory are much of what journalists value. From the free trade of ideas and diverse perspectives to the uncertain truth, these theories can be extended all the way to artistic, scientific and religious freedoms too. Continue reading Reflection: Art and freedom of speech