The right to vote for some, not all: An analysis of racism in the women’s suffrage movement

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

 

 

The debate about the legacy of the suffrage movement has been in the news cycle lately with the coverage about voters in this past election going from the polls to Susan B. Anthony’s grave to place their “I voted” stickers on her tombstone as a tribute for her work. News coverage pointed out that this tribute was particularly fitting because a record number of women were elected as governors and to Congress during this election cycle. Continue reading The right to vote for some, not all: An analysis of racism in the women’s suffrage movement

Kent State: A tour of the May 4 site

By Nicole Ziege (Video) and Emma Collins (Article), F/G Scholars

The site of the Kent State shooting still somewhat resembles the spot where four students were killed and nine injured nearly 50 years ago on May 4, 1970.

Since then, buildings have sprung up nearby, a gym has been built on part of the site and trees have been cut down. But the spots where four students — Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder — were shot are stilled marked on the parking lot where they died, and visitors can walk the same path that the students and national guardsmen walked long ago on a day that would mark a turning point in the public’s opinion of the Vietnam War. Continue reading Kent State: A tour of the May 4 site

Protest songs continue to spark controversy

By Emma Collins and Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholars

Helen Reardon grew up during the height of rock ‘n roll, a “lad[y] of the ‘60s,” as she described herself. She came of age when rock music challenged the status quo angering the older, more conservative generation with its sexual innuendos and political undertones. Continue reading Protest songs continue to spark controversy

Reflection: The other face of Vietnam, protests supporting the war

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

The era of the Vietnam War is well known for the anti-war protests, particularly during 1968. They were covered heavily by the media, and now some of the most poignant pictures of the war are of demonstrators marching or protestors burning draft cards. A lesser-known area of the Vietnam War protests were the marches and rallies held in support of the war. Continue reading Reflection: The other face of Vietnam, protests supporting the war

Reflection: First Amendment and the protection of inaction

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

Although the labor movement struggled at first, the protests led by laborers did eventually secure rights for the workers. It was only by exercising their First Amendment rights to protest that they were able to achieve this. As a result of the movement, laborers were able to form unions to protect their rights and fight for them if necessary. In many cases, union membership became mandatory, and in some cases where membership was not mandatory, nonmembers were still required to pay union fees. Mandatory fees have not always sat well with people, and it begs the question: Is requiring nonmembers to pay fees a violation of the First Amendment? Continue reading Reflection: First Amendment and the protection of inaction

Reflection: The legacy of Prohibition

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

Prohibition was one of a number of political movements that arose during the 1800s. Its proponents included people who were active in the women’s suffrage and the anti-slavery movements, and like those two movements, the movement to outlaw alcohol was ultimately successful with the passage of the 18th Amendment, which took effect January 1920 (Sanneh).

Prohibition’s legacy is mixed. In many schools, students are taught that the movement failed and lead primarily to the black market, bootlegging and an increase in organized crime (Moore). In reality, however, Prohibition did lead to some success Continue reading Reflection: The legacy of Prohibition

Reflection: Struggle between the empowered and the unempowered

By Emma Collins, F/G Scholar

Supreme Court cases often involve a legal struggle between the unempowered minority and the empowered majority, and First Amendment cases are no different. In fact, First Amendment cases may present this struggle more clearly because in many cases, those who are being silenced are the same people whose voices often have little power. Such is the case for the following five cases: Abrams v. United States (1919), Edwards v. South Carolina (1963), Tinker v. Des Moines (1968), Texas v. Johnson (1989) and Snyder v. Phelps (2010). Continue reading Reflection: Struggle between the empowered and the unempowered