Protest and sport: A timeline of dissent by American athletes after Jackie Robinson

​By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

The past few years have seen protest in sports become a hot-button issue, with the discussion growing and becoming more multi-faceted seemingly each day.

Many sports fans use the games they watch as a form of escapism. They want to come home after a long day’s work and watch Monday Night Football while attempting to block out the problems which plague their reality.

However, many athletes—particularly African-Americans—see the sports they play as the vehicle which helped them escape from impoverished communities, so naturally they want to seize this platform to shine light on issues that have afflicted their society. Continue reading Protest and sport: A timeline of dissent by American athletes after Jackie Robinson

“Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

The movie “Fire in the Heartland” begins with different shots of Kent State’s modern campus until a foggy substance begins to fill the screen, slowly revealing itself to be the tear gas thrown by the National Guard at hundreds of college students protesting the Vietnam War on May 4, 1970. The audience is transported back to that fateful day as the narrator begins to speak about the 67 total bullets fired over the course of 13 seconds which killed four students, two of which weren’t even protesting. Continue reading “Fire in the Heartland” shows Kent State shooting wasn’t an anomaly

Reflection: Echoes of economic protest in today’s entertainment

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

Karl Reuber is one of the few Americans remembered for his protest poetry during the middle and late19th century, using the lines of his stanzas to air his grievances with what he found to be an immoral and unbalanced capitalistic supremacy from the country’s elite. Reuber’s anti-business beliefs (as well as his contemporaries’) were anchored in spirituality. Continue reading Reflection: Echoes of economic protest in today’s entertainment

Reflection: Elijah Lovejoy and hiding bias

By Cameron Coyle/F-G Scholar

The majority of journalism students in America are taught to keep their political beliefs to themselves, but this seems to contrast the fundamental beliefs of Elijah Lovejoy, the man John Quincy Adams called “the first American martyr to the freedom of the press and the freedom of the slave” after his murder in 1837 (“The Story of Elijah Parish Lovejoy”). Continue reading Reflection: Elijah Lovejoy and hiding bias

Reflection: The language of protest and media bias

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

The media has a long history of covering events differently depending on the people involved in the story. Patrisse Cullors, the founder of Black Lives Matter, was quoted in an interview with Time Magazine in February 2018 saying she believed the Black Lives Matter movement was covered in a discriminatory manner, portraying them to be “aimless” and “too angry,” while Parkland protestors were treated like heroes, even though they were all essentially protesting unnecessary killings. Continue reading Reflection: The language of protest and media bias

Reflection: Free Speech and Alex Jones

By Cameron Coyle, F/G Scholar

Freedom of speech is an idea that does not have a concrete definition, but Thomas Emerson’s opening line in “The System of Freedom of Expression” makes a factual observation when he calls it a complex mechanism, which explains why so many theories revolve around free speech. Differences of ideas naturally lead to debates about what the difference of what can and should be said, and there is no better example of this in today’s society than recently de-platformed conspiracy theorist and political commentator, Alex Jones. Continue reading Reflection: Free Speech and Alex Jones